Pharmacy Services

Pharmacy Services Residency

Drug Information Service

 (PGY1 Required Rotation)

Preceptors:

  • Christina Beckwith, PharmD
  • Megan Dryer, PharmD
  • Erin Fox, PharmD, BCPS, FASHP
  • Kiersten Johnston, PharmD
  • Elyse MacDonald, PharmD, MS, BCPS
  • Dave Peterson, PharmD
  • Michelle Wheeler, PharmD
  • Benjamin A. Witt, PharmD, BCPS

 
Site Description (general):

The Drug Information Service (DIS) at University of Utah Health is a comprehensive hospital-based drug information service currently located in the College of Pharmacy. The role of the DIS pharmacist is to respond to drug information requests (about 200 per month) and support the P&T Committee by managing the formulary, preparing drug monographs, and coordinating adverse drug reaction reporting and medication use evaluation. Most drug information requests are specific to providing care to an individual patient. The DIS pharmacist also provides contract services on a national basis to organizations such as group purchasing organizations, and pharmacy benefits management programs. Contract activities include providing information on drug shortages, developing evidence-based monographs, and P&T support. The DIS staff provide all drug shortage content for the ASHP website. The DIS is a training site for pharmacy students and residents.

 
Rotation Description/Resident Expectations:

Residents will work closely with preceptors and are encouraged to ask questions. Residents respond to drug information requests, prepare a drug monograph for the P&T Committee, participate and attend P&T subcommittee or P&T meeting, modify or create new medication use guidance, participate in journal club, and prepare and deliver a statistics topic discussion. For writing projects, residents will learn to use Endnote referencing software and are required to follow checklists and staff instructions to ensure high-quality monographs. Drug information questions are received from many practitioners and usually involve patients. All DIS staff including residents coordinate responses with the clinical pharmacists in a particular area of the organization to ensure continuity of patient care. These activities require residents to develop their communication and literature evaluation skills as well as become proficient in the use of online and printed references. Many residents choose to be involved in the active training programs with students.

 
RLS Goals and Objectives

Goal R2.1: Demonstrate ability to manage formulary and medication-use processes, as applicable to the organization.

  • OBJ R2.1.1 (Creating) Prepare a drug class review, monograph, treatment guideline, or protocol.
  • OBJ R2.1.3 (Analyzing) Identify opportunities for improvement of the medication-use system.
  • OBJ R2.1.4 (Applying) Participate in medication event reporting and monitoring.

Goal R3.1: Demonstrate leadership skills.

  • OBJ R3.1.2 (Applying) Apply a process of on-going self-evaluation and personal performance improvement.

Goal R4.1: Provide effective medication and practice-related education to patients, caregivers, health care professionals, students, and the public (individuals and groups).

  • OBJ R4.1.1 (Applying) Design effective educational activities.
  • OBJ R4.1.2 (Applying) Use effective presentation and teaching skills to deliver education.
  • OBJ R4.1.3 (Applying) Use effective written communication to disseminate knowledge.
  • OJB R4.1.4 (Applying) Appropriately assess effectiveness of education.

Drug Information Rotation Activities and Teaching Methods Linked to Objectives:

Rotation Activity

Teaching Method(s)

Objective

Prepare a monograph for a P&T Committee (U of U or contract).

  • Use monograph checklist
  • Complete sections of the monograph by deadlines negotiated with preceptor
  • Incorporate feedback into each section of the monograph
  • Use the Endnote referencing system

Coaching
Facilitation

R.2.1.1 Prepare a drug class review, monograph, treatment guideline, or protocol.

R4.1.3 Use effective written communication to disseminate knowledge.

Spend 4-12 hours per week responding to drug information requests in the call center

  • Obtain a detailed history in order to determine the “real” question
  • Identify appropriate resources
  • Document findings in the DISCC database
  • Assess information gathered for relevance in answering the question
  • Identify any controversy or conflicting information found in the research
  • Prepare an evidence-based response based on research and clinical judgement
  • Communicate the response verbally or via email
  • Evaluate whether response was appropriate or if additional research is required

Customized based on resident’s baseline drug information skills

Direct instruction
Modeling
Coaching
Facilitation

R4.1.3 Use effective written communication to disseminate knowledge.

R4.1.4 Appropriately assess effectiveness of education.

Use and incorporate feedback from preceptors to continuously improve writing and call center activities.
Writing projects

  • Incorporate all feedback suggestions from preceptor before turning in next draft
  • Self-edit to ensure past feedback is incorporated into current and future work. For example, if you receive feedback on passive voice – work to remove passive voice from future drafts before giving to your preceptor

Call center

  • Incorporate feedback on research strategies and resources into future drug information questions

Coaching
Facilitation

R3.1.2 Apply a process of ongoing self evaluation and personal performance improvement.

Assess drug information requests for opportunities to develop, evaluate, or improve medication management policies.

 

Coaching
Facilitation

R2.1.3 Identify opportunities for improvement of the medication-use system.

Update a policy or guideline or prepare a new policy or guideline for review at a P&T subcommittee or P&T committee meeting.

  • Residents may also participate in a topic discussion regarding the medication use process.

 

Coaching
Facilitation

R2.1.3 Identify opportunities for improvement of the medication-use system.

Participate in adverse event reporting review.

  • Attend P&T subcommittee meeting such as ADR committee or Medication Safety Committee.

Coaching
Facilitation

R2.1.4 Participate in medication event reporting and monitoring.

Write a medication safety alert using information from an FDA MedWatch for posting at http://pharmacyservices.utah.edu/alerts

Coaching
Facilitation

R4.1.3 Use effective written communication to disseminate knowledge.

Prepare and lead a discussion on a statistics topic.

Coaching
Facilitation

R4.1.1 Design effective educational activities.
R4.1.2 Use effective presentation and teaching skills to deliver education.
R4.1.4 Appropriately assess effectiveness of education.

 
Readings and Preparatory Work:

Be familiar with the Drug Information Resource Center - https://pulse.utah.edu/site/dirc/Pages/Resources.aspx

Be familiar with contents of the Medication Management Process Q&A - https://pulse.utah.edu/site/dirc/Pages/med-mgt-process.aspx

 
Orientation Materials:

Your preceptor will meet with you on the first day of rotation to make an individual orientation plan with you. The Drug Information Service uses a variety of online training tools at – https://pulse.utah.edu/site/dirc/Pages/Training.aspx

 
Project Description:

Instructions and background for writing projects are found at the following links. Examples are available on-site.

 
Typical Daily/Weekly/Monthly Activities:

  • 8:00 – 4:30, Monday through Friday (average 2 – 4 half-days per week spent in the call center responding to drug information requests)
  • Monday morning staff meeting (8:30 am)
  • DI Rounds (1:30 PM Tuesdays or other designated time)
  • If applicable - attend quarterly ADR subcommittee meetings (to be determined)
  • Attend monthly Medication Safety subcommittee meetings (4th Tuesday of each month – 10:30 to 12:00)
  • If applicable – present at monthly P&T Committee meeting (3rd Wednesday of each month – 12:00 to 1:00 PM)

 
Evaluations:

At the midpoint of the rotation, the preceptor will evaluate the resident. At the end of each rotation, the resident will self-evaluate, the preceptor will evaluate the resident, and the resident will evaluate both the preceptor and the learning experience.

Updated August 2017